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citiesover counties named after him without creeder creek. the circle in washington depicts sheraton of the touring war house. in the act of realing his army at -- and no command the new army of the shenandoah. sheraton's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5", and only 115 pounds in 1864. but it's grant memorable replied to one officer who commented on sheraton diminutive statute, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheraton's appointment, confederate general and 14,000 troops had marched down the shenandoah valley across the plateau mick to washington. it was a shock. capital was thrown to a panic. grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside peter berg and early withdrawal. they merged four military department with the new one with sheraton in charge of it. he was ordered to pursue army to the death and to destroy the shenandoah valley grain, produce, and livestock. on september 19, he attacked the army and defeated it at the third battle of winchester. three days later, sheraton's army followed up wi
to washington as the nation's candidate for u.s. senate, goes to washington, already six feet tall, at the front of the line when they go to the white house and kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton looks forward and gets his picture taken a long side of john f. kennedy. he is so proud and he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. by the age of 17 he is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. egos to georgetown. from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother direct him to who are the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that is where his i has been. until he goes back to yale law
four words. but not these first four words. so, i'll quote. i it was so disturbing so washington, i had to put the book down. addressed to a woman i can only assume is grunwalds wife, it reads to christina, my stimulus. this twit was trashing my dedication page. and i don't think the terrorists who are trying to kill salomon rushdie ever trashed his dedication page. so washington, said this kid who lives in washington. i woman i can only assume is grunwalds wife. i can only assume you're single, dude. he says, if christina really is his stimulus, does that mean she kept him from collapsing into an unprecedented depression? if we accept the definition of stimulus as something that rouses or incites to activity, the note comes across as a strangely explicit display of wonky ribaldry. come visit us in south beach, kid. we'll show you something. my stimulus is here tonight -- wait, where -- there she is, and christina did prevent me from collapsing into a depression. anybody who has ever written a book can empathize with. she most definitely rouses to activity. and it's like, change that di
washington had to iranians. the same two the united states military stuck around to help train. >>host: first, was there any resentment on the countries where they talk about to damage their affairs or monitor hours? was there a resentment? >> that is a complicated question. in a period of 1968 and the british manage their withdrawal, many arab emirates announced they were happy to see the british leave. and did a guy is of the persian gulf they profess they did not want the united states to replace them. in private the era of small emirates along the coast were petrified. 150 years they had enjoyed a certain degree of british protection and those and their leaders made offers to both london and washington to offer financial incentives for the british and americans to stay. they were afraid of the giant neighbor to the north north, i ran that since world war ii had been attempting to reassert the influence that they had enjoyed in previous centuries and fearful of their own neighbors. many arab states harbored border disputes some claim the territory some claiming the island's in between. so
? >> they think of washington d.c. are the national monument why do they think of of potomac river? >> for those in the area is seen as an obstacle as they drive over or under it i wanted to stress we have an incredible natural resource there are very few levies we have bald eagles it is not solely clean but we work on that and by the way we get 90% of the drinking water comes out of the river. >> talk about the historical significance can you give us examples? >> mount vernon that washington known to because if you live there you got to pick the site of the nation's capital. now vernon is the most significant building on the potomac historic way. >> in your research i'm guessing you spent time on the river? >> i went to several hundred to visit to combine history with recreation. i hit all the sites people could go to but also take a hike or a jump in a canoe to have a good time. it is an enormous recreation opportunity for people visiting the area. >> thank you so much. >> by the way i have a sequel comin
. >> from the 12th annual national book festival in washington d.c., sally bedell smith presents her book, "elizabeth the queen: the life of a modern monarch." db is about 40 minutes.terri inn [applause] >> thank you so much, francis said that generous introductione i'm especially to be her today because our friendship goes bacto the990s hen honored the founding editor of the library of congress and it was his highly capable deputy editor. it fell victim to the first wave loss of funding, but this has gone on to be the top editor of the "washington post." as i have been traveling around the country, the one consistent question that i have heard is what did you learn that surprised you. >> the answer is that there was something unexpected around almost every corner. in my research, i made numerous discoveries about the way the queen goes about her job and about aspects of her character that people don't know about or don't fully appreciate. one of my main goals in writing elizabeth the queen was to part the curtain and tell what she was really like, taking the reader as close as possible t
online at booktv.org. >> from the 12th annual national book festival on the national mall in washington, d.c., sally bedell smith presents her book, "elizabeth the queen: the life of a modern monarch." it's about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you so much, francis, if that generous introduction. i have to tell you that i'm especially honored to be introduced by francis today because our friendship goes back to the mid 1990s when my husband, stephen, was the founding editor of civilization, the wonderful magazine of the library of congress, and francis was his highly capable deputy editor. the magazine, unfortunately, fell victim to the first wave of infatuation with the internetedt and lost its funding, but francis has gone on to be a top editor at "the washington post.n as i've been traveling arounds the country talking about queenn elizabeth ii, the one consistent question that i have heard is what did you learn thati surprised you. at did you learn t surprised you. >> the answer is that there was something unexpected around almost every corner. in my research, i made numerous discov
without cedar creek. a statue in sheridan circle in washington depicts sheridan on his towering warhorse in the act of rowling his army at cedar creek. green with age, a statute conveys sheridan's electric energy. lincoln and more secretary ever stand had thought of the 33 year-old sheridan too young when grant proposed in july 1864 that he command the new army of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grant memorably replied to one officer commented on sheridan's diminutive stature, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheridan's appointment, confederate general early and 14,000 troops have marched down the shenandoah valley, across the potomac at threatened washington, the tremendous shock, the capital was thrown into a panic, grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside petersburg, and early withdrew. to prevent a recurrence, the lincoln administration merged for military departments into a new one, with sheridan in charge of it. he was ordered
with the speaker. >> well, a washington lifer and thus was not the obvious choice to be leading this tea party class. nonetheless, he could see the tea party phenomenon for the freight train that it was an elected to be on the train rather than to be underneath it. and so, you know, the speaker campaigned heavily for a number of the two-party freshman, and he also, you know, believe that is presented the republicans and indeed america with a great opportunity. his belief, for example, was that this would be a perfect recipe for entitlement reform. he wanted, if you're going after in selma reform, you want ideally to have, you know, bipartisanship and pieces of the democratic presidents of the they could not walk away from it. and so he believe that he could leverage, you know, the deep conservatism of the two-party into action, but he has failed to do so. and the tea party freshmen with whom i spent a great deal of time, and i have spent time with an awful lot of them, you know, like him personally, found an admirable in the way of a genial ceo, but certainly not as their real leader. and that
leave a legacy to the nation. the list of those in the second term and would george washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, rall reagan and bill clinton. lincoln has a special case in the successful second term. it's interesting to note that only the president had a more successful second term than the first or james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president elected to the second term and the reason for those are the trouble second term. member for field because of the war that seemed on winnable or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also failed because of economic crisis or the failure to act to detour such a crisis and these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt with a 37 downturn and george bush to eight failed due to their inability to leave with jefferson, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. they failed to to franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four of them did not effectively communicate this agenda or initiative were jefferson, monroe, g
write on plantation society missed out in his last book was on george washington and slavery, entitled, an imperfect guide, which was published in 2003. at the end of his talk, he will be taking questions and we be available to sign copies of this book in the gallery. please join me in welcoming, henry wiencek. [applause] >> thank you, andrew. i very much appreciate your remarks in his homecoming for me because i spent many months upstairs and down the hall when i had a fellowship here to begin my research on the boat. i'm extremely grateful to andrew for all the aid he has lent me in support and also to dian jordan from a former executive at her and leslie bowman, current executive dirt for their support in the past into the present. this is a magnificent resource in the standard set of monticello is perhaps the leading public history study of slavery in the united states. the study of that subject is really very difficult for a number of reasons. one is that it's so hard to get the documents in the other is a psychological impediments that we americans have that best described by the
and his last book was on george washington in slavery entitled and in perfect god which was published in 2003. at the end of his talky will be taking questions and will be available to sign copies of his book in the gallery. please join me in a welcoming henry when sec. [applause] >> thank you. a very much appreciate your remarks. it is a homecoming for me because i spent many months upstairs and down the hall when i had a here to begin my research on the book. i am extremely grateful for all of the ways he has let me support over the years and also to up the former executive director of monticello and leslie bowman, the current executive director for their support in the past and in the present. this is a magnificent resource. as andrew says, monticello is, perhaps, a leading public history site for the study of slavery in the united states. that -- the study of that subject is really very difficult for a number of reasons. one is, it's so hard to get the documents, and the other is the psychological impediments that we americans have in that, as described by one hold, the theologian
of those who prevailed in their second term includes george washington, james madison, and rejection, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln is a special case and that his successful second term was so brief. it is interesting to note-only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first word james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president's elected to a second term and the reason for those of experience failed or troubled second terms. four failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable war for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and. were the four. also four failed because of economic crisis or failure to act to deter such a crisis. jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt, the 37 downturn and george bush. eight who failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grant, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and george bush. two failed due to who boris. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiat
of american power, washington had to rely on two surrogates. the saudis and the iranians. those same two countries, after world war ii, of which the united states military stuck around to help train. >> host: well, first off, professor, was there any resentment on the part of some of the countries in the middle east where we talk about taking over for the english, to manage their affairs or to monitor our affairs in the middle east? was there resentment in the persian gulf area about that? >> that's a complicated question. i would think for public consumption, in the period 1968 to 1971 when the british were managing their withdrawal, many of the arab emirates publicly pronounced they were happy to see the british leave. and under the guise of the persian gulf for the local powers, they publicly profess they didn't want the united states to replace them. in private, on the other hand, the arab small emirates along the southern coast of the gulf war petrified. for 150 years they had enjoyed a certain degree of british protection, and the small emirates and their leaders in diplomatic gath
-- the teachers including is a great one. the schools in washington, very successful about turning around inner city kids, and the kids in that school have to carry a book at all times. it's neat. funny you mention that. i did a reading at my home town, and my 2nd grade teacher was there. she's like 92 years old. i was signing books, and she said, james, your handwriting is still atrocious. [laughter] >> that's great. talk a little bit about where you see our culture going. you're doing -- >> oh, my god. >> i don't mean in general, but in terms of reading. are we creating a culture of readers, notary -- non-readers, where are we now? >> i think the worst thing that's happening is we're creating a culture where people don't listen. they don't listen to the other side. there's a quote -- i read an editorial in the "new york times" a couple weeks ago, and it had to do with morality's ability to behind -- bind and blind, and, you know, it binds people, you believe in, you know, you believe in whatever you believe in, abortion one way or the other or whatever you believe about entitlements or whatev
in the south, and who last book on george washington and slavery entitled "an imperfect god" which was published in 2003. at the end of his talk, he will be taking questions, and will be available to sign copies of his book in the gallery. employees join me in welcoming henry weincek. [applause] thank you. i appreciate your remarks, it's a home coming for me. i spent many months downstairs and down the hall when had a fellowship to begin my research on the book. and i'm extremely grateful to personally for all the aid he lent know support over the years and also to the former executive directer of month cello and the current executive directer for their support in the past and present. this is a great resource and as andrew says month cello is the leading -- the study of the subject is really very difficult for a number of republicans. it's hard to get out the documents. and the other is the psychology immedment that the americans have and as described by the though lodge began who happens to be the father of my editor, he says american americans by ultra additions are the most inn
how to manipulate the levers of power in washington. he understood human nature, understood the strength and weaknesses of the people in congress and how to play on those weaknesses and strengths. obama doesn't have that skill set to use human nature as a way of getting done what he wants to get done in washington. >> host: holm books have you written? >> guest: i think this is my 11th book. three novels and eight nonfiction. >> host: what do you say to critics of your books? >> guest: what do the critics say. >> host: the accuracy of the stories you tell, et cetera. >> guest: well, the fact of the matter is, as far as i know, there hasn't been a single fact in this book that's been challenged in a kind of credible way. people have said, oh, klein makes things up. that's what kids in the schoolyard -- they call each other names. i've been called all kinds of names. but in fact when it comes to the credibility of my reporting, i don't think anybody has laid a glove on me yet. >> host: how many university were you editor. >> guest: 12 years assed debtor in chief of "new york t
. the terms by which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have been the focus of intense debate but the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy". in it, she subjects assumptions and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a 123 caller battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect of the oxford trained economist whose chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in themselves and cautionary tale for those who would have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication of "regulating to disaster" calfs diana's first year as
your cia background. >> i worked at cia and nationalp intelligence counsel inac washington for about thirty fivl years.in >> what capacity? >> i became the national intelligence officer for latinee america which it a three or foua star military equivalent.on he was a civilian. it was a substantial position. i had responsibility for all of latin america and cuba. on the an lettic side oft -- intelligence. >> what does thatno mean? >> i was not a field operative. i did not go and conductof espionage. i did not go out and be foreignl agency. most of my career at headquarter mainly virginia. i wrote national intelligencean estimates. quite a few on cuba over the >> b years, and on many of the other ca latin american countries. how >> before we get to castro and the castro regime. at how did you get interested in the work? >> i was student at georgetownes university where i later taughte for about twenty five years as , an adjunct i'm teaching now atgo the university of miami. i was attracted to the foreigner service school at georgetown. it was a timeja when a lot of us of my generation
. douglas was reluctant but 1870 that brought in from is frederick douglass and washington because with him involved in local politics with the modern republican of party you was very much the republican party man. washington d.c. got self-government and was the first non-voting delegates to see that position he then continued as president of the friedman bank. he moved his family here. it has been many issues but we've learned about him but to go as the abolition does but later in life he has been ignored. spending time in washington and i started to look into his later life and there wasn't much written but it is a great opportunity. >> from the 1960's jfk signed but federal douglas historic site open to. with the national park service there is about 40,000 visitors every year. and high on the hill you can see the washington monument to the left and the u.s. capitol dome to the right. it is a majestic view and open seven days a week. >> soapy quote would read the book 1/2 not then there but to revisit. >> laraque reader at the douglas house, . >> the current curator he is a retired now bu
, not far from washington, and it is extraordinary how much people don't know. you know, just by virtue of being young. how would they know? they didn't grow up with parents who fought in world war ii. i explained how my uncle was thinking about whether he would be drafted ape had what we called a low draft number of the i thought, they don't know what i'm talking about. a low draft number -- draft doesn't mean much of anything anymore either. it's an interesting problem. it really is. >> i think it would be fascinating to think in terms of what is war? i mean, we've had war for ten years now, another war. they had war, but this war, no one's participated in other than certain percentage. it's out there. >> yeah. it's changed, hasn't it? >> yes, it has. >> and not -- it's not an obligation of citizenship anymore to fight for your country when it's at war. it's something that the professional military does. i think that's a profound change that's taken place. because of that richard nixon in 197 p 3, and, also, because of my generation, they wanted to put an end to the draft. >> [inaudib
a man named almond babbitt who was a lawyer and church member that the mormons had sent to washington as their delegate to congress. brigham young was, to put it mildly, not very happy with either babbitt or the federal appointees. he did not want non-mormons to interfere with the church's control of utah's politics. also, he had heard all sorts of negative reports about babbitt's activities in washington. babbitt had drank too much and had cozied up to politicians, hoping to get a territorial appointment for himself, all sorts of things. shortly after babbitt returned to utah, young summoned him to his office at 8:00 in the morning. yong rarely started the day so early. he liked to go to bed late and get up late and i think because of that he may have been in an especially cantankerous mood for the meeting. babbitt again by reporting to president fillmore hopes that you would not mingle your religion with your public duties. the president worries that young would be as a prince of this world and it prophet for the next. babbitt and young then argued over a few things. federal appropr
in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it meted out to people who dare to cross it. hubris, fanning a often claiming it was the center of quote the best housing finance system in the world of quote so ironically in retrospect of course. this sentiment being echoed by former senator and banking committee chairman dodd explaining that fannie was quote one of the great success stories of all times unquote and so it was until the fall it's humiliation. all five acts are very well kwon are called by bob's book. but which shakespearean tragedy is this in the background behind the history of fannie mae? thinking of the fear of fannie, perhaps it's richard iii with fannie as the ruthless richard brought down finally upon the field of bosworth by henry paulsen playing henry vii. , a thinking of ben fannie's ceo as presented in the book, pathetically presenting financial plans to a treasury department which had already decided upon and was indeed scheduling his fate. is it the great pathos full abdication sce
] on power, many people in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid for fannie mae and the restoration of weeded out to people who dare to cross it. i hubris we had seen it often claiming it was the center of the best housing finance system in the world, unquote. every so ironically in retrospect of course. this sentiment being echoed by former senator and banking committee chairman dodd, exclaiming cne was one of the great success stories of all time, unquote. and so it was until the humiliation. all five acts are very well chronicled by bob spoke, but which shakespearean tragedy is this in the background behind the history of fannie mae? thinking of the fear of cne, perhaps it is richard the third, with danny is the ruthless richard brecht and finally on the field of buzzwords by henry paulson plan henry the seventh. or thinking of then fannie ceo is presented in the book, pathetically presenting financial plans to a treasury department, which had already decided to bond and was indeed scheduling his feet. is it the great pathos fu
awake to brush this aside much the way george washington brushed aside his own complaint of subordinates in the revolution only key moments he put his foot down and essentially told the brakes to stuff it. that didn't stop from becoming a thorn in the sight of all american commanders in europe for the duration of the war. but ike, omar bradley, george patton on managed workarounds to minimize the negative in fact of the war effort. so when the war in, we are expected to supply wealth and prosperity to all be due to the best of our ability and yet this brings with it this irony that by supplying wells and protection, you are eroding the very disciplines necessary to maintain and perpetuate prosperity for yourself and prosperity and freedom for others. therapeutic challenge of the next 75 years in the topic of volume two. how to provide a canopy of liberty and perpetuate american exceptionalism while allowing just enough of the rain of difficulty and disappointment to remind american and the world that the era in which we have all been blessed with no golden accident. [applause] >> will ac
the issues. again this going to tell a story. before i do that, because i am from washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all of some of the church retreat to my will report year that the most popular cost and that is completely is binder full of women. >> what did the selling custom look like? you put your arms in the binder. it's like not at jack in the box . pops out of a little fuller think. said we were bell in washington. very creative. i'm just going to tell the story that inspired me to read my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlanta store which cannot in 2010. basically i have been vacationing for a long time which is a pretty prosperous working class town. when you went there. it seemed like it or not that many men around. it seemed like a was not seen them in church, at the fairgrounds, driving down the street, trucks, during construction. this is the height of the housing collapse that anyone talked about. and so men were having a lot of hard time. the loss of a lot of manufacturing jobs. and i really became curious about this.
in richmond, virginia, educated at washington university and later learned a ph.d. from yale. he spent his first ten years as a newspaper man mostly doing general assignment reporting, and i bet if i called on many of you, you could easily name his novels; "the right stuff," "in our time," "the bonfire of the vanities" and many more, and now "back to blood" which reflects miami back to all of us. how are we going to react to that? he is credited with the birth of new journalism and the death of the american novel by some. he is the mark twain of our time. how lucky are we to have a moment in time with him? and what better way to start this conversation -- hopefully i can get them to come to the stage -- than with a published author in his own right and a man whose name is synonymous with leadership, our own former mayor, manny diaz. manny diaz, let me turn it to you. hopefully, we can get him up here, and tom wolfe. please welcome them. [applause] >> well, good evening, everybody. and let's get this started. if "bonfire of the vanities," you chose new york with wall street and the upper ea
which reflect the subtitle congress in the washington correspondents and it's amazing that is also the is an area where don has developed his knowledge and his way of thinking about congress and the strict application of oral history and to put it in the perspective which through his books survived. one of the purposes of the talks actually is to demonstrate how resources of libraries and in particular the library of congress are used by scholars to point out all of the effort that we going to in kettering the collections when the working of the historians and library hands for the public sometimes has a pay off in a real book and a book that will live and be shared by many and that of course is what will happen to not only done's books but also to the experience of fdr and the election of 1930 to which we are interpreting and reinterpreting, and we have a wonderful speaker to help us with this. associate historian of the year donald ritchie. don? [applause] >> we have a great crowd here today. very thankful you all can now. surprising because here we are in the middle of a huge pr
of washington, d.c., wayne karlin talking about his book wandering souls which is an account of the u.s. soldier return to vietnam to return a notbook he took from a soldier he killed during the north vietnam war. >>> joining us now on booktv is author and professor wayne karlin who most recent book is "wandering soul." professor karlin who was homer? >> he is a friend of mine who retired living in north carolina. he was a officer platoon leader in the vietnam war. and he had contacted me a number of years ago because i had some contacts in vietnam vietnamese i had been working with, he had taken a documents and a book from the body of an vietnamese soldier he killed during the war. and wanted to see if he could find a family and return those documents to this them. >> why. he had gone through decades of ptsd, not only because he killed that man, he had a rough war, he killed many people he had seen many of his own men killed, went through a lot of the pat earns that people tend to go through with post-traumatic stress, an adrenaline junkie. he wrecked card, he -- cars, had had a hard time formi
's presidential debate and did on going fame of the presidential campaign. the terms of washington assisted the auto industries have been intense debate but the most contentious example it is one of that diana our speaker this afternoon focus it is on her timely book "regulating to disaster". she subjects the assumptions and policies that late bled to ill-fated when assessments like solyndra and a123 battery car manufacturer that we have come to expect from this former chief of staff for the council of economic advisers during the administration of president george w. bush. she helps us understand while the failures of private firms have significant problems themselves and cautionary tales to have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication of regulating to disaster caps her first year as a senior fellow in which she has been prolific and influential cited by a writers, reporters and talk show host across the country. to think of her many contributions ranging from her analysis demonstrating even adjusting for the state of the economy those receiving food
nominated to go to washington as the quote unquote boys, nation candidate for u.s. senate. goes to washington, he's already six feet tall. he strives to the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy. and then when kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton votes forward and get his picture taken with, alongside of john f. kennedy. is so proud. he is so proud. and he is already dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. it already, by the age of 17, is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas, and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. it is not go to the university of arkansas, he goes to georgetown. and from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for the rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere, but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother directs him
book? >> the tea party goes to washington, it was about the tea party movement, i think it was the extraordinary movement, probably the biggest movement in happen in forty years. a lot of people showing up. hundreds of thousands of people showed up. it transforms the way we think about this. people request whether or not the law obama is one example whether they were constitutional. >> i don't want to talk about 2012. i'm tired of 2012. let's talk about the future. 2012 wasn't a very good one for us. we have to figure out a way to appeal to a bigger e welcome or it rate. >> are you running for president? >> that's classified. your clearance is not high enough to hear that. part of the national debate, i think it's too early to make decision. >> "government bullies," the second book by senator rand paul. how everyday americans americans are being harassed. >>> booktv attends a book fair. she signs book for american for tax reform here in washington. the book is "mugged: racial demagoguery from the seventies to obama." this is about twenty minutes. [inaudible conversation
trial, but now she goes and starts recruiting in high society washington and she was a very prominent woman with many prominent friend come easy access to the leadership of the country. shoe into the is user good hospices until a until he should part with arthur. his mother is very good. the execution is worse than the crime she couldn't contemplate arthur would be executed. he and jackson were on lives of the clock keeps ticking. >> otb cytometry and four to discuss his book, "the coming prosperity." or fessler are spoiled was in attendance at the book festival held at the annually. >> joining us at george mason gears professor philip auerswald, his most recent book is this, shrink three. here's the cover of the book. what role does fear play in development? >> well, that's a great question. they don't talk about what role does fear play in our conversation about development, so when we talk about our reality to share our ideas in the marketplace can we compete with other atheists only know three things about marketplace ideas. short-term sells better than long-term. fear sells bette
, talking to johnson, both in bangkok and in washington. but when they did start recruiting soldiers, the king made it clear that he supported the venture. he bid farewell, sponsored a lot of celebrations that marked the departure of these troops to south vietnam. he showed a direct personal interest in their well-being. visited the wounded seems in the hospital when they came back. he presided over funeral ceremonies for them at these. so from the very beginning thailand was involved. as for whether he would give his blessing had it gone forward, i don't know. it's hard to imagine without his support such a thing taking place. >> host: currently what kind of relationship does the u.s. military have with the thai military? >> guest: the united states still has a close relationship with the royal thai army. this hasn't changed since the vietnam war. we have regular annual exercises with the thais and other regional armies, but they hold them every year in thailand. and many of the thai officers trained in the united states and have contacts with the american counterparts here. so, tha
waiting in the 1970s to philip gasoline in the washington d.c. area. just as the programs didn't work then and are not working now, they're unlike to work in the future. it's just that the government is not good at picking winning projects. the government wouldn't have thought of picking apple iphone five for example. that is expensive, but people wait in line because they want to buy one. it's not necessarily technology and expensive. is it just know what people want spend money and we don't know what it is. but there's other smart entrepreneurs and i'm sure many in the audience who have a better idea than the folks in washington. >> would you be in favor of a significantly higher gasoline tax to address the hidden social cost of pollution, what economists refer to as externalities? >> if i thought the castling were underpriced coming if they would be in favor of a carbon tax, not just gasoline, but that would affect energy. i don't believe energy is underpriced in the united states. there's many benefits of energy. is my job mobility. particular gasoline, people been able to drive o
and apply toward democratic structures because right now from washington is like the faraway farm that is generating these laws and the tomatoes that taste like cardboard is in a lot of mandates that, down from washington. it's truly vital and self-government. in vermont with some examples of how individuals in towns and counties have been able to do all kinds of really exciting work on the local level. so i thought local, and this is where the action is and they still think it's incredibly important. what i learned in the course of the book was the importance of dialogue and deliberation and that did not come easily for me. i'm someone who likes action. i don't like meetings. i don't like sitting there. i think when can i get home? i was not as convinced of is so important for us to get together and have conversation and share a casserole or some name like that, but working this season and see the example, talking about the examples of communities and action really convinced me, particularly portsmouth, new hampshire. they were the good middle of a bitter, bitter school redistric
and the wars in iraq and afghanistan. for about an hour at politics & prose in washington dc. >> evening, i am bradley graham, co-owner of politics & prose with my wife melissa. on behalf of the entire staff, i would like to welcome me you here. before turning to our guest author, i would just like to say a word about an important event coming up this april. it is being called world book night and it is an ambitious attempt to hand out 1 million free books around the united states. you can read about how this amazing effort is being organized, and sign up to get involved yourself at us.worldbooknight.org. the deadline is tonight, but there is still time after this event. now, a word about our guest this evening, paula broadwell. also, vernon loeb. and the new book, "all in: the education of david petraeus." paula was given unusual access to him and brought his story up today. as she writes early in the book, one of his most important mentors, general jack galvin, talk to him about the concept of the big "m", which stood for individual mystique or mythology. the troops need to be able to make t
to say that because i'm from washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all from love to trick or treat, i will report here that the most popular cautioned that has come up lately is binders full of women. [laughter] spent what does this hollow and caution look like? you put your arms in the binder, and it's like sort of nodded jack-in-the-box. it's like a jack lalanne in the box. who said we're dolan washington? i'm going to tell a story that inspired me to write my book. this began in 2000. the book is based on a story came out in 2010, and basically i had been vacationing and have a longtime which is a pretty process working class down come and one year i went there and it seemed like they were not that many minaret piercing like i was in a church, the fairgrounds, and driving down the street. this was at the height of the housing collapse that a needed talked about, and so many having a hard time. this was when we talk about the man session and he session. i really became curious about this. i read a novel, sort of half sci-fi, half depressing novel that
and washington state who will actually vote on marriage equality at the ballot box in early november. if that happens it will be the first time there is equality is achieved at the ballot box without a lawsuit, without legislation and so on and we have one state, minnesota, which i think of as being pretty liberal. al franken is there senator, they will be voting on whether or not to add a constitutional amendment defining marriage as between one man and one woman. so it is a big year for this and we also will appear in a week or two which cases the supreme court will take up. there is coal proposition 8 case coming out of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality so it felt appropriate to write abou
. those of us who work in the policy world in washington sometimes risk becoming so a related to the news that in a sense our senses are doled amid no longer recognize the human consequences of tyranny and various public policies. this book, "escape from north korea" come as the perfect antidote to that phenomenon. melanie does an absolutely masterful job introducing us to some absolutely extraordinary individuals. tim chavan, the first pianist at the symphony who escaped to china, is arrested three times before he finally makes it to freedom all because he simply wanted the freedom to play the music of this choice. she gives us the story of stephen ken, you want a businessmen in china working for wal-mart attending an underground church in sinn fein, who happens to cross a of north korean refugees and make it so moved by their fight that he decided as a part-time at dignity, he hopes for north korean refugees escape from china. he gets arrested for the dvds and spends three years in jail before returning to the native state deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north koreans. he
fall seven or 800 points but washington will get the message. what i fear and what i think is the risk is that they will fix it with a patch that is short-term, it's not substantive, it doesn't have a lot of nutritional content to it and we are going to be right back in again and again. markets will lose confidence. we will gradually lose our global credibility as an economic leader. we might see our credit rating damaged more over time. and it is the slow defense of the united states that is the real risk. the fiscal cliff is something that can be fixed fairly easily. >> host: finally, i would like to go back, david rothkopf come to your comments about government. national government being neanderthal it. there was a throwaway line of sight while we are still organized as nation states economically. again, where we going in the future. >> i think we will see the future. because we live in geographic proximity to one another, we also have city governments, state governments in the united states, we have a federal government in the united states and it's only natural that another layer
institution, a major think tank in washington. the former secretary of state, and as a journalist for time magazine in the 1990s, they wrote an article in which he welcomed super national political authority. he said, quote, "i'll bet within the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete and all states will recognize a single global authority." he concluded saying "the devra davis luges of power upwards of units of administration is basically a positive phenomena." coe, currently, today, the chief legal adviser of the u.s. state department, in other words, he advises the president on what the law is, was gave a major speech last week at georgetown law, a major figure in international law writing, quote, "domestic courts must play a major role in coordinating u.s. domestic constitutional rules with the rules of foreign and international law. to advance the broader developments of a well-functions international judicial system." well, think about that for a minute. american courts can't coordinate the law from international law. they won't have influence over international
he goes to washington and he tsra six feet tall. he strives the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy and when kennedy finishes his speech bill clinton goes forward and gets his picture taken alongside at of kennedy. he is so proud, he is so proud and he is already dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who will bring complete honor to the family. prd by the age of 17 is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and then president of the united states. this is something which everyone you knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes a candidate for a rhodes fellowship and goes to -- he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother directs him to gore the beauty queens, who are the ones who are flirtatious and who are attractive and that is really where his eyes had been. and tell the goes to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this a
by seniority so maybe one could have become a chief justice by seniority, but now. resident george washington thought otherwise and actually nominated justice john jay in that case by separate commission and so that established the pattern that someone gets nominated to be chief justice up through the ranks and beyond that, to have -- how the court operates and what it conceives as jurisdiction. for for instance many high courts around the world can give what we would call advisory opinions to the executive branch of their government or their legislative branch can say you know if we did such and such a thing when it passed muster and they would say yes or no and if the answer is no they would go back and redo it and bring it back again in a kind of works that way. are court very early on established that it was not issued by jury opinions. there had to be an actual case or controversy, and at first dealing between two or more parties before the court would take would take up the case and that was really quite important in terms of how our law developed in a relationship between the judicial
have to remember also that washington really believes in zero sum politics. this is not an orgnal ..e that the leaders on both sides have not been so much about how we fix a problem but gain and maintain power. and so a lot of these discussions have been about how the republicans rolled back the obama administration, making we can then ultimately overtaken and how they maintain that power once they have it. i mean, cloaked in the argument of what is good for america, but there is not allow a policy prescription in there. >> thank you. >> this event took place at the seventeenth annual texas book festival in austin, texas. for more information visit texasbookfestival.org. >> tell us when you think of your programming this weekend. comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail. nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> next, chrystia freeland talked about a rise of the superrich, the.-- the top 0.one% of the population and the impact they have in the world. this is hosted by politics and prose bookstore in washington d.c. and it is about an hour. [applause] >> thanks a lot. sorr
well during the war of 1812 so washington, dc burned. the early attempts to invade canada don't go very well. they're all catastrophes. my impression the canadians look at the war of 1812 victory, sort of a great victory of repelling the american invaders. after the war of 1812 you have a big movement that there needs to be a systemic way of selecting and preparing officers to be in the army, to be commanders, basically. >> host: who spearheaded the change after 1812? >> guest: the crucial figure is scott. a wonderful figure. his career begins before the war of 1812, and extended right until the opening of the civil war when he finally retires. but he -- jacob brown, a few other officers, but scott is the most important. they become very much -- their agenda very much is to build a proper professional institution and take expertise, usually european, usually french, and bring it to the united states. so, another major figure of this would be astaire, who was sent on a mission to france, basically to collect information about military education. he collects huge numbers of books and mate
national book festival on the national mall in washington, d.c., bob woodward presents his book, "the price of politics." this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thanks.k it's great to be here. i'm going to put myself on the clock so i don't talk too long,h and then we have lots of time for questions. and then we have lots of times the questions. and i want to begin by recounting something that occurred about five or six years ago my wife and i were at an aging conference and how to deal with aging. how many people are interested in the subject of aging? raise your hand. okay, you all are. i tell you. at age 69, i am deeply interested in the subject of aging. and they have psychiatrists and physicians and so forth on this panel. james watson, who was the codiscoverer of dna, the nobel prize winner was also on the panel. we had the discussion and it went on for an hour, and watson said nothing. that is the end of zero comments. now, you know the power of silence was just overwhelming, and so finally, the moderator, charlie rose asked him, doctor watson, you have done so much work,
come to you imagine the entire washington matcher area, about 3 million people. imagine all those people blind, now they can see. that's not an scare story story, right? it's not a good scare story and the worlds of people who circulate where i circulate. people travel from all of the world to go to that hospital to train, to bring the same programs to their countries. it becomes a movement to end needless blindness. vicious one example. you might say that's a crazy story. that's got to be an exception. hundreds of stories like that. those are the stories that are transforming the global economy. not just the economy, the society building the future. >> so as to say in the next 20 years, 3 billion more people enter into the world of economic freedom. >> cognitive freedom, economic freedom. >> is at the wild wild west? how should it be managed? >> well, my core metaphor in describing the economy and the interaction of the economy and society is rain forest. and when we go to the rainforest, whether it's the pacific northwest or the amazon, you have a sense of life all around you be
because of but to say it is a perfect example when they came together to work as one. washington state university. wrote to a play with his stated goal of defending ever but a. [laughter] he put it everywhere. like do not come. and it was the absolute goal. that those that were angry with the musical comedy for them to stand up to yell i am offended because that is the point* of the play. [laughter] but it got much worse. it turned into deference which it did predictable. and the university president defended it then next day to say this is a responsible exercise of free speech. it is a great point*. >> do you see any room for fired two expand into canada? >> you look familiar. >> but i think good depth of a nonprofit is to spread itself too thin. like people if we want to work and let us know noted that and the freedom of conscience issues but canada desperately needs a fire. >> absolutely if anybody wants to start a fire i would get behind them. >> thank you. >> hello. i go to the most expensive colleges and the country. >> not great with free-speech coats. >> specifically wind healt
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